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yan. tla there's been tough military action. you flee that environment. you come into the united states. you go to school. you get a scholarship. you have friends. but somewhere in that leadened, deadened heart, head of yours, it's still not good enough. there is a cause that's more important, not survival, and i'm not sure we'll ever be able to comprehend that. we need to try because it may give us potential to identify other people. here we have a rather remarkable journey these two young men took. a journey literally millions have taken. and they've contributed to the united states. their contribution was death and destruction. of innocent people. we may never understand, rationalize, how. >> as you reference the uncle who pleaded with his nephew, dzhokhar, give yourself up, give yourself up. and of course that is the fervent wish of law enforcement officials for a number of reasons. one is for the survival of dzhokhar tsarnaev because there is a manhunt for him and he will not escape that network of law enforcement at some point. this will not come to a good end. but also fro
some of the actions taken in the post-9/11 environment. there's some key questions one of -- some key questions we wanted to address this point but to the treatment of suspects -- rise to the level of torture quick secondly, if so, how did this happen? and what can we learn from this to make better decisions in the future? on the first question, we found that u.s. personnel in many instances use interrogation techniques on detainees that constitute torture. american personnel conducted an even larger number of interrogations that involve cruel, inhumane or degrading treatment. both categories of actions violate u.s. laws and international treaty obligations. this conclusion is not based upon our own personal impressions, but rather is grounded in a thorough and detailed examination of what constitutes torture from a historical and legal context. we looked at court cases and determined that the treatment of detainees in many instances met the standards, the courts have determined as constituting torture. but in addition you look at the united states state department in its annual count
environment and have been a part since iceland was -- [inaudible] >> taking step back and looking for a broadly two things i've been talking about climate change and fishing. has global environmental change been benefit to iceland's fishery or a detriment? >> well, it's very difficult to an that question, indeed it's one of the big issues -- a number of decades because it has tradition nayly been the key part of the export driven fishing circle. of course the species as well. some people are arguing cue to the -- [inaudible] so one of the reasons why there is a need for more active arctic corporation is in fact to study what is happen together fishery in the ocean of the world including the arctic and the ice melt. and i found it interesting when i invited them to iceland a few years ago, he is, as you might know, a special envoy of the president of france on arctic and polar issues. his argument was that the first dispute that would unearth nationings to a new situation in the arctic would be dispute over fisheries. that the meting of the arctic sea ice and the transmore fashion
easy. it is challenging in this fiscal environment. administrations 39 budget -- $39 million budget request. consistent with what congress appropriated in 2013 for the department before sequestration cuts were applied. the level of funding in this budget is lower than what congress appropriated in 2009. stepping back and thinking of the challenges that our country and this department has faced since 2009, times square bombing, hurricane sandy, the ever-changing and growing cyber threat, and of the boston attack, it is easy to become concerned with this budget request. we are facing extremely difficult budgetary times. sacrifices must be made. they may not receive all of the funding. and agencies in government must share in the sacrifice to some extent required during this deficit. our secretary seems to have taken this message to heart. he is identified $1.3 billion in savings this year and more than $4 billion since 2009. he continues to move from a risk-based approach and it effort to save more money. i'm happy to see this budget proposes a much-needed increase for cybersecurity,
security gates at elementary and intermediate schools to create a safer learning environment. the new exterior fences define school boundaries making the schools safer for students. entourier gates were replaced, providing the ability to lock off specific areas of the schools during emergencies. again, it's common sense but when these schools were built, madam president, no one thought about this. everything was open. like the capitol, when i came here, i'm dating myself, a long time ago, you could go anywhere. no metal detectors, no fences. walk up the steps to the capitol we have lost a lot of that freedom and our world is now to balance our freedom and the greatest country in the world with security. and that's what we're trying to do with this. in minnesota, we saw grants used to conduct security assessments and institute safety training classes. in palmer high school in colorado they implemented lockdown and evacuation procedures, doubled the number of doors operated by security cards so it reduced the number of outside individuals gaining building entry. it makes it harder for p
down and hone in on any place and anybody in this environment, this young man primarily and any family members who may know where he is. i'm looking at couple shots we're getting here. back in watertown, you have ongoing presence of the police there as well. they're trying to focus in where he may have gone, if he remains in watertown. if he was able to slip perhaps out of that cordon and if indeed he is still on the run, bill. bill: yeah. martha, just one thing to add from boston on that. we're hearing that logan airport has been closed. we can't confirm it but we're being working to that. some folks are saying trying to book to flights in washington and those flights are being diverted. "the boston globe" is saying the m.i.t. police officer that was killed in a confrontation with these terror suspects was sean collier, age 26, out of summerville, massachusetts. per the district attorney in middlesex county. it is possible that sean come letter, age 26, will indeed be the hero of this story and sitting in his car and gunned down in his car we don't know what he saw. it is possible he
, open public venue 500,000 people you can't create a fail safe environment. >> reporter: investigators have swept up a large amount of potential evidence including small bomb fragments and surveillance pictures and tape but we have to say it's too early to know if this attack was a work of a terror group, domestic or foreign, or the act of a lone wolf who was inspired to act out. charlie? >> bob orr, thanks. cities around the country increased security. with us now is rudy giuliani mayor of new york city during the 9/11 attacks who consults with other cities on handling terror attacks and also john miller, nypd commissioner during mr. giuliani's tenure. a this turns the clock back to 2001. whatever the thinking was on september 12th is now the thinking today. >> it really reminds us right, of what we knew on september 11th and september 12th that the big news here is this is a horrible attack terrible attack, my heart goes out to the people that were hurt but surprising there haven't been more of these since september 11th. we expected many attacks like this.
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7